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tax rates and he was elected based on his tax the rich policy. he says that america is poised to take off and if it doesn't, it's the republicans fault. listen. >> you have the u.s. chamber of commerce hardly an arm of my administration or the democratic party. i think, said the other day, we can't be going through another debt crisis, a debt ceiling crisis like we did in 2011. that has to be dealt with. so, i think businesses are going to be ready to hire. we're seeing pretty strong consumer confidence despite weaknesses in europe and even in asia. i think america is poised to take off. stuart: well, the republicans are set to respond today when speaker boehner goes in front of the cameras. will he show signs of retreat or any sign of compromise? remember, the president wants higher tax rates. will john boehner try to move the line that the president has drawn? we will have it for you live here on "varney & company" starting around ten o'clock eastern. then we have darden restaurants, the parent of olive garden, red lobster. it says its businesses could be hurt by bad publicity. dard
have to give him credit, calm, cool, collected, holding the line and remembering what this election is all about. get your cell phones out. i want to know what you think. tonight's question. will republicans punish speaker boehner for trying to work with the president? text a for yes, b to no to 622639. you can always go to our blog and leave a comment. we'll bring the results later on in the show. joining me tonight is congressman emanuel cleaver from missouri. congressman, great to have you with us. >> good to be with you. >> you bet. i would like to talk about the congressional black caucus if i could. they have been very, very strong about do not touch the entitlements, we're not going to move on this. so you have the president not moving on rates. you have your caucus not moving at all on entitlements. although you said the democratic leadership -- you said you could support means testing for medicare. what does that mean and how far are you willing to go. >> first of all, social security is off the table. there are not only 42 members in the congressional black caucus who woul
of the election. issues like entitlement reform and new revenue, but he's going to have to do something big. there's been a four-year course of he doesn't get along with either party, doesn't make the kind of effort you're talking about. i don't think there's any doubt he's going to, particularly john boehner, find some human interconnection moment that says we're doing this. and that's when the tough part starts. because once there's a leader deal, getting it through the house, whatever the terms of it is going to be super hard. >> i was with a group of businessmen last night, and their question was, why don't the people in washington do what we do when there's an important decision that comes up? why don't they get into a room and hammer it out, get some food, drinks, whether it's a couple days, get them helicopters, and go to camp david. you get in a room together -- >> the president -- the president doesn't like doing that. he's not comfortable doing that. and jon meacham, that is not the opinion of a pundit, that is a matter of historical record for his first four years. is it not? >> that's
talking about every morning here since the election. fiscal cliff, big, big issue. there are now, it seems, growing numbers of people on both the right and the left who would like to see us just go over that fiscal cliff. how big of a problem would that be? >> that would be a big problem. i actually still believe that those -- the democrats, the administration, republicans in the final analysis don't want to see that happen. they do understand that not only would that present a problem in the near term as we went over the cliff at the end of the year, but we still then have the whole debt ceiling fight that would transpire shortly into the new year. the issue isn't simply the negative result of going over the cliff, but it's also that business, consumers, everybody continues to hold back on the uncertainty. and we believe the economy is pretty well positioned potentially in 2013 if we can put this behind us. so i think a lot of what's going on is what you would expect to see in this negotiation, very public negotiation, which is not the best way to do it. i think at some point, the preside
a pretty dramatic shift since the election, and certainly i salute him for doing this, he actually is very engaged with the business community. and i'm not hearing the sort of things from top ceos and business leaders today that i heard the first four years. maybe -- maybe he's leaning in here and trying to rebuild a relationship with some of these people who supported him in '08. >> and i think it goes both ways. i think the business community views this deficit thing as the biggest problem that we can solve that we need to solve. there's something called a campaign to fix the debt, which i'm on the steering committee, 120 leading ceos from everything from general electric to jpmorgan on down. really committed to doing something and accepting the idea that revenues have to go up, not ideological about how, but most of all, wanting a big $4 trillion package. and so they have become, in effect, allies of the president. they're really trying to get to the same place. at some point there may be differences over how much entitlements, how much this or that, but right now their interests are al
elections taking place in japan on the 16th and south korea on the 19th of this month. well within the range of this test that is scheduled to come in the coming days. influencing their neighbors and influencing politics and testing new ground with what would a second-term approach be with obama. bill: this is what we believe to be the ultimate range. 5,000 to 6,000 kilometers. 3,700 miles. china to the west here. in japan well within range of north korea were to be successful in developing this launch mechanism. here is hawaii. that's outside the range of the 6,000 kilometers. the question then begs how realistic is it that north korea would be a threat to the united states? >> through pro live raig they could be a threat to the united states. and if they were to hit our allies in the near range. in the south and also japan. those are the near-term risks. but proliferation could occur at any time. they were able to reach to hawaii ... bill: history shows they are not very good at this. are they getting better? >> only more tests will tell. you are correct history has shown it's been embarra
for years. >> even though democrats won the presidential election? doesn't that change the calculus? >> he would say these people are all safe seats if they don't get against the pledge. norquist has the division so to speak. he could destroy any republican who says the word tax increase. has he said -- he said if they're seduced by democrats in pure thoughts this is the so-called i can smell pornography when i see it. this is pornography for grover norquist. he can smell it when he sees it. he will target. he will destroy republicans who go against the pledge. he's much more powerful than any individual republican. and individual ceo. let's just face it. i've always felt he was the most powerful person in the class of '76 at harvard. enjoyed his success because he was a fellow member of the harvard crimson. i just disagree with him. terrific guy. >> with friends like that -- >> with all due respect to my ex-partner larry kudlow with all due respect. >> the treasury secretary talks about how he does not think that in the end the gop is going to prevent tax rates on the wealthiest from risi
, people were saying you got to incorporate poll workers for the election. you had holiday hiring. you had sandy. i mean, it may be -- the journal argued it's the least important jobs number in five years. >> i saw that. i do think one thing we can certainly say given that china seems to be stabilizing a bit, we can all discuss europe. greek situation. maybe it's off the front pages for a while. and so if we assume that the jobs picture in the u.s. is not bad, let's assume not bad, it puts even more of a focus on the fiscal cliff negotiations because it becomes even more binding one would assume in terms of good or bad for the market, for the economy. >> kernen had a good point. does strength mean the economy could handle a cliff or is it so good you wouldn't want to tamper -- >> if i wanted to create a recession, what would i do? i would raise everybody's rates. i would cut the unemployment benefit. just trying to think of a theory of how i could cause a recession. i would cut back government spending quickly. >> i would raise interest rates to 20%. >> bernanke ought to join the -- look,
the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. it's unfortunate that the white house has spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> the administration has presented a plan that calls for $1.6 trillion in new tax revenues. $400 billion in cuts to medicare and other entitlements. $50 billion for a new stimulus and congress would have to give up control over raising the debt limit. republicans have indicated that they want to raise revenue by lowering tax deductions, haven't given any specifics yet. brings us right to white house correspondent brianna keilar. good morning, brianna. >> good morning to you, soledad. yes, things are at an impasse here. i will tell you the white house after not being very happy with the pace of negotiations the week before last sent treasury secretary tim geithner up to the hill to outline this proposal. there's a lot we already knew about that president obama had already taken a public position on. the white house is now saying to republicans as well, we want you to put
, the former companisy campaign manager of president obama's re-election campaign. howard kurtz the host of "cnn's reliable sources" lauren ashburn, republican from texas, congressman jeb hensarling with us, randy weingarten, president of the american federation of teachers. all guests this morning. wednesday, december 5th, and "starting point" begins right now. >>> our "starting point" this morning, president obama putting his foot down. he says no tax hikes for the wealthy, no deal. america hits that fiscal cliff in 27 days and that means tax hikes and deep spending cuts if the democrats and the republicans can't come together in some kind of a deal and with just ten days remaining until congress is scheduled to go home for the holidays, the clock ticking. here's what he told bloomberg news. listen. >> we're going to have to see the rates on the top 2% go up and we're not going to be able it to get a deal without it. >> we start this morning with white house correspondent dan lothian, he's in washington, d.c. okay. so who's got the ball in their court at this point then, dan? >> well,
answer, but in a minute. let me get to the big concern. the entire conversation since the election has been litigating gone squaquarter of the preside own architecture. all we're talking about is revenue, revenues, revenues. the white house has been absolutely silent on 75% of their own described remedy and that is where are the cuts. now, secretary geithner comes to capitol hill and with a straight face says we need to spend more money. we need more stimulus spending. look, i come from the state of illinois which is an example of what not to do. the state had the same underlying problems, that is runaway spending problems, and they came up with the wrong solution. raise taxes, don't deal with the underlying problem, chase an entrepreneurial class out. $7 billion in unpaid bills and higher average unemployment rate. it is a system for failure. so what's happening with my neighbors in illinois, and these are the people that are minkd their own business, not paying attention to all this stuff, all of a sudden they're looking up and saying why is it more expensive for my child to go to th
to the sixth which happens to be the election on tens, you will notice -- this is weird. this is a 21st session that we're going to be looking to close in a range between 158 and is 169. we were at the 175 mark. that was really a changing moment for treasuries. if you open the chart up to a 20-year chart, maybe sometimes some out there forget exactly how low these yields are. look at that 20-year chart. contrast it with s&p 500 chart. what a difference. obviously the feds program to push people to risk in some ways is working but in ways it's not working. look at flows. it's in treasuries. not in the equities. now if we look at the euro, let's look at euro from year-to-date. doesn't look bad. about month and a half high. let's go back to 2000. doesn't look nearly as good. the winning chart on perspective perspective is dollar/yen. look at that year-to-date. it looks like it's really going to explode. if you look at a 20-year chart, we're just dancing around the bottom. jim cramer, back to you. >> drives me crazy that i can't figure that out. let's check out the latest news in energy and metals.
on the ballot, proposition 8, california voted in a close election to overturn same sex marriage. same sex marriage was banned after it was briefly legal. the federal district court had a trial there, and said that law, proposition 8, banning same sex marriage, is unconstitutional. that was affirmed on appeal, that is now appealed to the supreme court and they will now decide whether proposition 8 is constitutional or not. >> when we talk about this as being a historical sort of review, clearly there were different laws passed at the state level. so now it is really up to the federal government to kind of step in and say, okay, this is where we have to come together on our thinking. >> it is up to the united states supreme court. not the federal government. the federal government, the last word they have is the defense of marriage act. and what makes this so significant is that the supreme court has not really engaged with the issue of -- of gay rights since 2003. nine years. that's a long time. the country has changed dramatically in those nine years. there is a new gallup poll out that s
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)